Inconstant Tales #2: The Salad Leaves That The Slugs Wouldn’t Eat

I love to grow leafy edibles. The speedier, the better (please send more supplies of focus and patience). But it’s not just the fact that growing salad leaves is a quick way to gain produce. The carpet of green is calming. The number of varieties is wide-ranging, which is just enticing. I am drawn to growing as many types as I can find – or rather, fit in.

However, those young, juicy leaves can be predated by the slug thugs. Seeing your precious green plants all munched can be disheartening, but I see that as an opportunity. The way I see it, the slugs have thrown down the gauntlet of challenge, and I do like a challenge. Can I grow edible leaves that they do not like?

Growing Salads as Experiments

This August, I am planting a round of new leaves which will be left out as part of this annual experiment. Their outcomes will be noted in future posts.

Today’s topic is the main leafy mix that in the last couple of years has gone untouched by our resident slugs and snails. One salad crop is lightyears ahead of the rest: Salad Leaves Oriental Mix. I started purchasing this mix from Simply Seed a couple of years back for an absolute barg of 99p. According to Simply Seed, this mix consists of:

  • mizuna
  • mibuna
  • green mustard pizzo
  • mustard red zest
  • pak choi canton white
  • tatsoi
Oriental Mix: some of the individual leaves

I’ve grown mizuna and pak choi separately as stand-alone crops, with mizuna indoors and pak choi indoors and outdoors. The latter was predated a little by slugs. I can understand that the spicy leaves may be untouched, as I’ve read that they’re not bowled over by spicy leaves, but this mix still carries those unspicy leaves and that juicy pak choi. Yet the slugs and snails did not touch a leaf. Not a single one. These leaves have been outside periodically in spring and summer this year, plus autumn last year, and not a leaf left the building. I advertised them. I left them in a prime spot where the slugs have helped themselves to beets and courgettes, but not these.

Now, I cannot guarantee that this will be the case for everyone. Maybe the slugs will get desperate. Maybe they overlooked the juicy pak choi while the alternatives were more appealing. Nevertheless, I’m going to plant the rest of these seeds, and let them outdoors again, unabashed and blowing free.

Salad Leaves: Oriental Mix in terracotta pot

If you do choose to grow this mix, here are some growing notes:

Salad Leaves Oriental Mix

(from Simply Seed 2019, 2020, 2021)

Position: they have grown successfully in partial shade in a greenhouse or outdoors (at the time of writing, August)

Autumn results: they lasted indoors here in northern England in an unheated greenhouse until (mild) November – later than my cut-and-come-again lettuce types

Soil type: soil used was sieved (peat-free) homemade compost mixed with topsoil

Water: regular watering needed to remain moist (daily in summer)

In situe or transplant: Withstood transplanting

Harvest: continued to regrow after 2-3 rounds of cutting the adult leaves

I’m looking forward to experimenting with the other leaves, particularly the red varieties, but at the same time there’s some trepidation. Some leaves often remain under tight security because I like them too much to risk sending them out into the big wide world! Full of things that see salad as their top takeaway!

Are you growing any varieties of salad/edible leaves, and if so, how are they doing?

9 Reasons Why you Should Spare the Slugs and Snails in your Garden

When gardeners gather together to chat about all things plants, whether they grow flowers or vegetables, it is not long before the topic of slugs and snails comes to the fore. Phrases like, ‘the slugs have eaten all my dahlias!’, or ‘they’ve devoured all the lettuces!’ are not uncommon. Gardeners, garden magazines, and garden books alike frequently discuss how to get rid of slugs and snails. How to stop slugs and snails from eating our beloved plants is not an unfair topic, but many articles and book chapters still cover how to kill slugs and snails, while neighbouring articles document how to save bees or hedgehogs. Gardeners around the UK have taken heed and implemented wildlife-friendly plants and practices into their green spaces that will help pollinators, amphibians, and hedgehogs, but the molluscs (the term for slugs and snails) haven’t quite reached the lofty heights of protection. It is easier to make room for the wildlife that is helping the garden, while simultaneously waging war against our ‘plant predators’. However, removing the slugs and snails may harm the helpful wildlife and ultimately the garden itself. Here are 9 reasons why you should spare the slugs and snails in your garden.

1 They Are Food for Other Wildlife

Slugs and snails have to watch out for several predators. They are a meal to many other creatures including frogs, toads, hedgehogs, and garden birds. Even ducks and chickens will devour slugs. According to the RSPB slug guide, they are also food for foxes, badgers, slow worms, and even beetles like the violet beetle and the Devil’s Coach Horse beetle. And according to Country Life, garden snails are loved by songbirds. Remove them and you could be removing a vital food source of other wild animals.

2. They Do Not All Eat Your Plants

Have you noticed that not all your garden slugs look the same? There are dozens of slug species in the UK. Not only do they look different, but their choice of food also varies. Some prefer decaying matter, some prefer to stay under the soil, and others are omnivorous!  Snails also have numerous types. Country Life writer Ian Morton writes that there are over 120 snail species in the UK. They have a wide diet, from living plants to decaying matter and other animals.

3. Some Slugs Eat Other Slugs

Omnivorous or even carnivorous species of slugs might not be eating your plants but actually eating their sluggy neighbours. Meanwhile, some slugs eat other animals: the John Innes Centre describes the Ear Shelled Slug as an eater of mostly earthworms, not your plants. Therefore, if you kill slugs and snails, you may harm the ones that are helping you out.

Slugs vary in species and their choice of food

4. They Help Maintain Good Soil

Given that many of them feed on decaying matter and live in the soil, they help gardeners by breaking down organic matter added to feed the garden beds, borders, and plots.  They also plough routes through the earth. Soil needs pockets of air and space to provide drainage for plants, so it helps to have creatures like slugs, snails, and worms working through it.

5. Gastropods Help Make Compost

Make use of their presence in your garden and make compost. Slugs which flock to your compost bin are interested in decaying matter and will break down the green waste in your compost heap. Combined with brown waste, this homemade organic mix is a valuable supply of nutrients to plants in pots and borders.

6. Remedies for Killing Slugs are Harmful to Other Animals

Slug pellets could be consumed by other wildlife, poisoning them in turn. Even if other wildlife does not eat the pellets, animals like hedgehogs, frogs, and birds could eat the poisoned slugs and snails, possibly receiving a larger dose of the poison if they consume more than one mollusc.

Bowls of beer or cola are another classic slug and snail killer, but again these could kill other animals. A liquid like beer or cola could be drunk by birds and amphibians could drown in it. The use of salt could also harm other animals in the garden including pets.

Many remedies promoted as ‘all-natural’ are not naturally occurring in the least, instead containing household chemicals. If you want to maintain an organic plot, it is best to use control methods that do not harm the neighbourhood slugs or snails.

Abundance: predators are attracted to gardens with plenty of food like snails

7. They Help Attract Other Beneficial Wildlife

If your garden seems to be inundated with slugs and snails, use it to your advantage to attract predators. Beneficial wildlife will congregate in accessible, abundant gardens. You have already got a good food supply of slugs and snails – now just add water, sheltered shrubs, and a gap in the boundary so they can flock to your garden café. This could attract predators of other plant pests too, helping control aphids or flea beetles.

8. Nature Puts Them There for a Reason

Before you wage war against anything that eats a lead in your patch, stop and think about why it is there. Everything in the garden and nature has a place, it has a role to play. Removing it could cause an unseen issue. It is also impossible to remove slugs, snails, and every pest; slugs and snails amount to a population in the thousands in an average garden, while many pests pop in and out from other gardens and even the pots of new plants. Instead of trying to remove each pest or hoping that all your plants will be uneaten and perfect all the time, expect all these pests and plan some of the garden for them and some for yourself. Use these obstacles to improve your knowledge of plants and your creativity in gardening.

9. Wildlife Friendly Means All Wildlife

If we are to help reverse the dangers that British (and world) wildlife are facing, we must help all wildlife. This means helping the cutey ones and the fluffy ones, but also helping the small slimy iffy-looking ones. Remove one, even just a few slugs, and you take away a food source, or a link in the wildlife chain. We need a wildlife corridor across our lands, with food and shelter along it and even one slug (or twenty) in one garden – like your garden – is a help towards saving animals like hedgehogs, frogs, and garden birds.

Now when you are next in your garden or green space, try one thing: spare a slug, or spare a snail.